How to Use a Japanese ATM (The Basics): Part 2

By Donald Ash | Articles

(updating…)

Hopefully you’ve read Part 1 of “How to Use a Japanese ATM” as it shows the essential kanji we’ll be dealing with when using the ATM.  Now, I will show how to do each of the procedures step by step.  First, let’s examine how to do a basic withdrawal:

1. WITHDRAWAL

When withdrawing money, please mind your zeroes.  I had a friend who accidentally withdrew most of the money that he had in his account, because he added an extra zero by mistake.  (Please see the    article if you’re a little confused about US Dollar to Yen Equivalents…don’t worry…I try to keep things simple).

Next let’s do a basic deposit together:

2. DEPOSIT

With deposits, some machines do actually have slots to deposit coins, which is quite convenient.  It’s makes sense, though, because whereas we would use a five-dollar bill in the U.S., Japan has a 500-yen coin.

And now, let’s check our balance together,

3. BALANCE


And now for the transfer,

4. TRANSFER

The transfer video idea comes from the “How to Send Money Home From Japan (Part 2)” article that I did a while back. I feel this is probably one of the most important ATM details, so I put a little more effort and time into it.  If you have time, please take a look at that article before trying to send money home.  You might find it informative.

Lastly, we’ll take a look at how to update your bankbook or passbook as they say here in Japan.

5. PASSBOOOK/BANKBOOK UPDATE

I hope you found today’s videos useful.  If you have any questions, I’ll do my best to answer them.

Thanks for watching,

Donald Ash

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Donald Ash is an Atlanta, Georgia-born, American expat who has been living in a Japanese time warp for the last ten years. While in that time warp, he discovered that he absolutely loves writing, blogging, and sharing. Donald is the creator of thejapanguy.com blog. Wanna know more about this guy? Check out his "What's Your Story" page.
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